Scoop.it

Everyone’s talking about curation these days, and who better to talk curation than librarians?  We’re all about sorting through information avalanches.

Enter Scoop.it, an easy way to build attractive, annotated, librarian-approved webpages of online resources for your students. 

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Scoop.it lets you

  • choose and edit Scoop.it search streams, focusing on the social web (Twitter, You Tube, Google Blogs, etc.)
  • log in using Twitter and FB, helping you find community instantly
  • post selections to blogs and social media
  • annotate selections 
  • select images to accompany entries
  • comment and contribute to Scoop.it topics  
  • harvest sites outside of Scoop.it search streams with their handy bookmarklet
  • subscribe to appropriate RSS feeds to update your page
  • discover new sites, and include the ones you know are good
  • use Scoop.it goodies like slide show embeds

The design of Scoop.it reminds me of Lib Guides and Pinterest—orderly boxes that whisper “yes, you are in control!”

I made a Scoop.it this morning about Children’s Book Awards. Using their search discovery feature produced a mess of stuff I couldn’t use (surprise).  

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However, it did turn up a fantastic Lib Guide from Huntington College gathering the awards I had in mind when I typed in my keywords.  I used my knowledge to determine that Huntington’s list was excellent, and turned it into an attractive, annotated web page.

The page I made this morning was a quick response, but the program allows you to search topics over time, allowing you to build precise lists slowly.

I wish

I want to tag my Scoop.it, but can’t figure out how. I couldn’t tweak the title of my Scoop.it after the initial christening. I want to embed the whole page on a website instead of just the (awesome) slide show goodie, below.